Life skills from the Navy Seals…..

Admiral William H McRaven gave an insightful life lessen in a graduation speech in 2014.  Key points came from his basic seal training back in 1977 and is highly relevant today……..  You can track down the film on You Tube…

If you want to change the world – or just your part in it:

Start with making your bed.  what was the point of daily bed inspections?  To set the bar.  If you can’t do the little stuff – you’ll never do the big stuff. It sets a positive note for the day – you’ve completed your first task!  If nothing else, you’ll come home to a well made bed!

Learn how to paddle! A boat will only travel efficiently if everyone works together.  Know when to ask for help. The ‘munchkins’ where the best paddle team.  From different backgrounds, different statues, all had heart, worked together and won the challenge.

Get over being a cookie – for failed uniform inspection, seals had to go in the water then roll in the sand – called ‘cookie’.  They then stayed in this all day.  Many couldn’t take this constant failure and dropped out.  They missed the lesson of failure.  You have to keep going.

 

Embrace the circus: for failing a physical challenge, a Seal had to do two extra hours.  Embrace it, it builds stamina.  The lesson is you will fail and sometime fail often but keep going, it builds stamina and resilience.

 

Go head first – sometimes you have to do things a different way and dive in.

 

Face down the bullies – Seals are trained to stand their ground when swimming in shark infested waters.  If a shark circles – punch it hard on the snout – it will swim away.

 

Be the best you can – especially in the darkest moment.

When you’re up to your neck in mud – start singing! – The power of hope.  It takes just one person and spreads quickly.  Think of Washington, Lincoln, King, Mahala

 

Don’t ever ring the bell!  In Seal training, there is a brass bell which people ring  to give up.  Never give-up.  Keep going you will succeed.

 

“Start each day with a task completed. Find someone to help you through life. Respect everyone. Know that life is not fair and that you will fail often. But if you take some risks, step up when the times are toughest, face down the bullies, lift up the downtrodden and never, ever give up — if you do these things, then the next generation and the generations that follow will live in a world far better than the one we have today.”

“It matters not your gender, your ethnic or religious background, your orientation, or your social status. Our struggles in this world are similar and the lessons to overcome those struggles and to move forward—changing ourselves and the world around us—will apply equally to all.”

“Changing the world can happen anywhere and anyone can do it.”

Some great lessons for us all………..

Mum’s on the school run….. don’t judge!

Recent generations of working parents dropping their children off at school on their way to work have received a bad press for blocking drive ways, parking on yellow lines, causing congestion and so on.  Apart from saving time, using the car to drop children off ensures the parent their child has reached school safely.  Of course, we then have the argument about unfit/obese children who miss out on nature walking to school!

 

So it made me smile reading in The Metro this morning about a group of mum’s who heard a women shouting she was being robbed, spotted two men loading items into their van and collectively used their cars to block the van and men in whilst the police were called!  If they didn’t take their children to school in their  cars, they wouldn’t have been able to do this…

 

There is always another way to look at things.  I’ll remember this next time there is a bad press story about parents dropping their children off…… will you?

 

Acting on instinct………

An excellent story in The Metro this morning of taxi owner/driver Satbir Arora who had the courage to listen to his ‘inner supervisor’.

 

You can read the full story on the link below.  In short, the taxi had been booked by a male but the sole passenger picked-up was a young female teenager.  Satbir grew concerned and called his wife – also co-owner of the taxi business – who asked the girl some questions before calling the police.

 

Thankfully, in this instance the girl was saved from a potentially life threatening experience thanks to Satbir and his wife’s quick thinking.  How many times do we think ‘that doesn’t seem right’ but then fear of ‘interfering’ takes over and we say nothing?

 

The famous African proverb springs to mind ‘it takes a village to raise a child’.  Times have changed.  It is often easier to turn away rather than step in.  But what does that say about our society?

 

Hero taxi driver saved 13-year-old from paedophile who planned to kidnap her

 

 

The ‘Internal Supervisor’……

I heard this term for the first time on the ASIST 2 day workshop in Brighton.  A fellow delegate was a psychotherapist and used it to explain a technique used professionally.

 

When speaking with a client, she uses her ‘Internal Supervisor’ to highlight the occasions to dig deeper.  If she found herself getting bored, was her client getting monotone and repetitive.  Often people do this when they are trying to avoid the real issue.  As she explained this, I realised we all have an ‘Internal Supervisor’ or ‘gut instinct’.

 

I must admit, I had never questioned my moods when listening to someone else but I will from now on.  It’s a logical tool to use in supporting people to ensure we dig deep enough to get the entire story out.

 

Are you intone with your ‘Internal Supervisor’?

Shennell – what an inspiration……

An elated Shennell sent me the feature photo of her graduation on 21 November 2017.  The smile says it all.

 

I first met Shennell on Growing Talent 5 over two years ago.  She had left university due to peer pressure, amongst other things, just one term short of completing.

 

Her self-esteem was low and she couldn’t see which direction to go in.  Gradually her confidence began to Grow through the workshops, mentoring and positive peer/employer support.  She completed Growing Talent and joined Iron Mountain a document management organisation.  After a few months she applied for and secured a front of house role with Portico.

 

Completing her degree was always in the background.  Eventually she chose to leave Portico to return to uni – but life doesn’t always go to plan.  She worked for various organisations and looked at some training in marketing before finally returning to uni this year.

 

Shennell is an amazing role model for never giving up.  I am so proud of her achievements and look forward to the next chapter………..

 

Go Shennell!

Suicide – how do you intervene?

Due to the work I’m honoured to work in on Growing Talent – mentoring unemployed people from all backgrounds into permanent jobs – and Mental Health & Well Being course design and delivery, it isn’t a rare thing to encounter people with suicidal thoughts.

 

There is a growing spotlight on suicide.  Network Rail and the Samaritans have started a joint campaign asking the public to start a conversation with anyone they see in distress at train stations.  An excellent campaign and I strongly believe you cannot make a situation worse by talking.  However, I do feel strongly that some training is needed not only to recognise turning points but also agreeing safe plans and self care.

 

Having been an MHFAEngland instructor for several years, I felt pretty confident in supporting people through their suicidal thoughts.  However, the suicide section on the MHFA format is one 1/2 day and coupled with depression.  Some good knowledge but not in-depth.

 

I’d heard about LivingWorks ASiST (www.livingworks.net) global programme – 2 full days dedicated to suicide intervention which was formed in Canada and is now being delivered globally.

 

Finding organisations that deliver this valuable workshop – and believe me, you do work on it – is not easy.  An internet search found @GrassrootsSP – an amazing organisation based in Brighton.

 

21 and 22 November were intense days in Brighton.  The learning was so much more than expected.  The networking with other delegates was invaluable – learning from each other.

 

I thoroughly recommend this priceless experience.  Which should be part of every school curriculum.  The sooner we start talking about suicide and mental health the easier it will be to save lives.

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