Will it work?

Today sees the official launch of the Government’s Kick Start programme aimed at  unemployed 18-24 year olds.  The idea, as reported in the press this morning, is Government will pay employers £1,500 per head towards a 25 per week, six month work experience placement.  The Government’s idea is many will be kept on or step into permanent jobs elsewhere.  Referrals will be made by JobCentre Plus staff.  One of the first employers to sign-up is Tesco who want 1,000 people.

Check out http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-53985144

 

Alarm bells are ringing for me.  I wonder if this has been thought through properly.  We have evidence from various previous work programmes including the recent Future Jobs Fund which doesn’t seem to have been learned from going by the press reports today.

 

My concerns are:

 

  1.     Will there be vetting of employers to ensure integrity that these unemployed young people won’t be scarred further by being used for six months in basic roles with nothing at the end?
  2.     Is a robust audit trail in place so all parties are accountable and progress/gaps in training are addressable?
  3.     What ‘work experience’ elements will be focussed on to ensure attractiveness to employers who do have jobs but don’t want to have to ‘re-train’ bad habits?
  4.     How can employers in good consciousness take part if they have furloughed/made their own staff redundant?
  5.     JobCentre Plus staff are on a huge recruitment drive themselves with thousands being recruited into Work Coach positions.  How will KickStart be managed to ensure any concerns raised are investigated quickly?

 

At Growing Talent, we know it’s successful even where there are multiple barriers to employment in place for unemployed individuals because:

 

  1.     There is a dedicated mentor for individuals, employers and sole contact with JobCentre Plus leads to monitor progress and address issues immediately
  2.     There is a robust audit trail to highlight progress/training gaps
  3.     It’s five weeks long including a week orientation and holistic whole person skills
  4.     There are robust employer and participant agreements in place
  5.     There is a permanent job ring-fenced for the individual at the start of the journey which is theirs on completion

 

I would personally be more reassured if this KickStart programme was targeting future industries – Artificial Intelligence, Coding, green energies or industries that usually look at degree education/experience such as financial services.  To ask someone to work for six months with no guaranteed job on completion with employers like Tesco fills me with concern.  What about you?

 

 

 

 

 

Labels = Stereotyping

Quite rightly there is a lot of talk around ‘slave labour’ and ‘modern slavery’.  There is an undercurrent of this in the UK especially in the ‘hidden market’.  There are vulnerable people who are exploited and their ‘exploiters’ – I won’t say employers – quiet rightly should be held to account.

 

However, I do believe this isn’t a black and white subject.  I now hear of unpaid interns, work experience and similar programmes being labeled ‘modern slavery’ or exploitation.  Is this right/fair?

 

From the Modern Slavery Act 2015  this definition is to me is very clear ‘These crimes include holding a person in a position of slavery , servitude forced or compulsory labour, or facilitating their travel with the intention of exploiting them soon after’

 

For those of us stereotyped by society due to our personal circumstances such as homeless, unemployed, single parent, on the domestic violence register, mental health or physical issues need a different route to sustainable employment to those not living with these labels.

 

Some time ago I was a single parent, officially homeless with two children under 6, on the domestic violence register and holding down a number of deadend casual jobs to feed my children.  Although not diagnosed, the situation I was in was clearly making me anxious and depressed.

 

I knew the only way I could change my circumstances for the long term was to secure a job which would lead to a career.  But how could I do that?  I hadn’t worked in the previous 10 years apart from building up a business with my ex-husband who was not going to give me a reference!  I saw the look on employers faces when I mentioned I was a single parent and officially homeless.

 

Then I had an idea.  Before having my family, I’d worked for a global organisation in financial services.  I was not on benefits – the DHSS at the time (prior to JobCentre Plus) advised me to get married again – sensitive right?   I found a local accountant and offered to work for them for no money for a week.  At the end of that week I would either be paid and given a permanent part time role or I would be unpaid and released.  I worked for that accountant for over four years before  securing a permanent full-time role in recruitment which led to some amazing achievements including setting-up my own business.

 

Was I exploited?  No I had an opportunity to learn a role and showcase what I could do without having to ‘sell myself’ at interview with little recent experience and zero confidence.

 

Years later whilst working for a national facilities company as Recruitment Manager, I noticed how difficult it was to recruit and sustain local people.  There are a lot of residential estates around Canary Wharf but, at the time, a lot of 3rd even 4th generation unemployed families.  I remembered my experience all those years before and devised the Real Apprentice.  A work experience programme that focussed on building self-esteem and work place ettiquette.  The Real Apprentice ran for over eight years and got 75% into permanent jobs.

 

The Real Apprentice was vetted by multiple award bodies during this period and won several awards year on year including BiTC – Big Tick, Dragon Award – Lord Mayor, Opportunity Now, Race for Opportunity, ENEI, The best of Europe against 23 countries  and a Justice Award.

 

So clearly – no one felt the Real Apprentice was in the category of the often, and not always correctly, used term ‘modern slavery’.

 

I was approached by one leading employer from the Real Apprentice and challenged to devise something better. In December 2013 Growing Talent was devised with a provisional  permanent job offer upfront, an Orientation Week to build confidence and work place etiquette prior to going on site, a Holistic Week to deliver soft skills knowledge including personal finance, fitness, nutrition, art, as well as qualification as a Mental Health First Aider. An audit trail provides accurate progression status and is managed by the individual.  Unpaid, participants retain their benefits and have their travel paid.  If they choose to drop out they are not penalised by JCP.  Giving them control and the ability to showcase what they can do without the pressure of traditional recruitment. Over 140 people from all backgrounds have secured permanent jobs and flourished

 

No cvs, no formal interviews and no job descriptions.

 

For those who don’t have ‘labels’ and aren’t stereotyped their default is often straight to shout exploitation/modern slavery.  Just think for a  moment.  If you were stereotyped because of your ‘label’ would you be able to showcase your ability in a formal recruitment interview?

 

For those of us who have experienced this stereotyping, we need a different, bespoke solution to securing a permanent sustainable role.

 

What do you think?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modern Slavery & Human Trafficking – What I’ve learnt….

Today I did an online two hour course by High Speed Training – and thankfully passed!

 

The modules were broken down into clear, informative parts for the lay person.  We all make assumptions about terms such as ‘Modern Slavery’ ‘Trafficking’ ‘Exploitation’.  The misconception is this goes on in hidden areas – not in our circles.  However, key industries these issues have been found in include hospitality, fishing, factory work, food processing, leaflet delivery, tarmac, paving, agriculture, cannabis farms (these are in residential houses), domestic servitude, sex industry and criminal gangs – ATM thefts etc.

 

In 2000 the UN met in Palermo, Italy to agree three protocols.  Clearly 18 years later, the problem is still there.  So learning some possible signs and what agencies to involve has got to be a good thing.  Knowledge is power after all.

 

Learning about the tools used by traffickers, including religious beliefs, has been an eye opener.  Equally understanding and supporting someone who has experienced any kind of trauma/abuse can be misunderstood as lying due to not always being able to recall events easily or in the right order.  We must remember trauma interferes with this process – people aren’t always lying.

 

Let’s not assume.

 

If you are interested in doing this online course check out http://www.highspeedtraining.co.uk.

 

 

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