If our children are growing up hungry – where are businesses getting their future talent from?

Listening to the radio this morning, the above question jumped into my head. I have my solution at the end of this post. What would be your thoughts?

Time for us all to have an uncomfortable conversation maybe?

The radio feature was on free school meals and the excellent spotlight the footballer Marcus Rashford has shone on this.

Children going hungry is shamefully not a new problem for the UK. Following the end of WWII, free school meals were introduced to ensure no child went hungry. Bearing in mind this was a time when food additives, were a lot less intensive than they are now. Basic, nutritional food that ensured healthy growth for all children in the UK was the norm.

Over the following years, we seemed to lose this ‘collective’ thinking that we are all responsible for the health of the next generation.

I well remember the endeavours of chef Jamie Oliver from 2004 to address putting ‘nutrition’ back into school dinners cost effectively. This would ensure concentration in lessons resulting ultimately in social mobility. Education on an empty stomach is totally non-productive and a complete waste of money. Children can’t concentrate with their stomachs rumbling. As adults, we know when we’re hungry we can think of nothing else. Why would we think it’s different for children?

The radio feature this morning spoke about Jamie’s work and the fact two of his chefs are working in Schools in Greenwich to help feed children nutritionally during school holidays.

Marcus has re-foccused the spotlight back on the need to feed vulnerable children during school holidays as parents struggle through coronavirus.

Many parents will feed their children fast foods because they are cheap. Quantity is better than quality thinking. We know fresh food doesn’t have to be expensive. It does take effort to buy and prepare especially when trying to hold down a number of poorly paid jobs to provide a secure home.

A few of ideas spring to my mind:

  1. Tax cheap, fast food so it becomes a ‘treat’ and heavily discount fresh foods so they become the norm.
  2. I know from experience many families won’t apply for help even when they are entitled. Pride gets in the way. Radical thought here – provide free school meals for every child so not one child is ‘singled’ out as being ‘poor’. From 5-18. Schools become community hubs. Open through school holidays. This would create:

a. Employment throughout the UK

b. Community cohesion

c. Brain power amongst all our children to take advantage of education, realise their dreams, become the innovators of tomorrow, feeding our businesses making the UK a vibrant country of integrity for all.

Of course there would be a huge cost for this. But, what is the cost of not doing it?

As a business owner, I’d be in favour of increased taxes if they were going to this worthwhile cause. I wonder if very wealthy people, would be willing to make annual donations to this cause and write this off against their taxes? Some people earn telephone number salaries and are reluctant to pay HMRC. No one likes paying taxes. But if part of their taxes went to a specific cause like this, would their attitude change if they could see the good they are doing?

A minority of the UK are living in a bubble where they have so much money they will never be able to spend it. Maybe social taxation could be the answer.

Maybe it’s time to do something radical and something different.

What would be your thoughts?

Will it work?

Today sees the official launch of the Government’s Kick Start programme aimed at  unemployed 18-24 year olds.  The idea, as reported in the press this morning, is Government will pay employers £1,500 per head towards a 25 per week, six month work experience placement.  The Government’s idea is many will be kept on or step into permanent jobs elsewhere.  Referrals will be made by JobCentre Plus staff.  One of the first employers to sign-up is Tesco who want 1,000 people.

Check out http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-53985144

 

Alarm bells are ringing for me.  I wonder if this has been thought through properly.  We have evidence from various previous work programmes including the recent Future Jobs Fund which doesn’t seem to have been learned from going by the press reports today.

 

My concerns are:

 

  1.     Will there be vetting of employers to ensure integrity that these unemployed young people won’t be scarred further by being used for six months in basic roles with nothing at the end?
  2.     Is a robust audit trail in place so all parties are accountable and progress/gaps in training are addressable?
  3.     What ‘work experience’ elements will be focussed on to ensure attractiveness to employers who do have jobs but don’t want to have to ‘re-train’ bad habits?
  4.     How can employers in good consciousness take part if they have furloughed/made their own staff redundant?
  5.     JobCentre Plus staff are on a huge recruitment drive themselves with thousands being recruited into Work Coach positions.  How will KickStart be managed to ensure any concerns raised are investigated quickly?

 

At Growing Talent, we know it’s successful even where there are multiple barriers to employment in place for unemployed individuals because:

 

  1.     There is a dedicated mentor for individuals, employers and sole contact with JobCentre Plus leads to monitor progress and address issues immediately
  2.     There is a robust audit trail to highlight progress/training gaps
  3.     It’s five weeks long including a week orientation and holistic whole person skills
  4.     There are robust employer and participant agreements in place
  5.     There is a permanent job ring-fenced for the individual at the start of the journey which is theirs on completion

 

I would personally be more reassured if this KickStart programme was targeting future industries – Artificial Intelligence, Coding, green energies or industries that usually look at degree education/experience such as financial services.  To ask someone to work for six months with no guaranteed job on completion with employers like Tesco fills me with concern.  What about you?

 

 

 

 

 

Growing Talent 22 starts – remarkable!

What’s remarkable? Lots of things – depending on who you ask!

 

For employers it’s likely the fact they recruit in a free, no risk way.  Selecting from a pre-screened pool of talent, employers don’t select those who can do the roles but those who have the ability to grow into their roles.  This is key.  The six week journey of Growing Talent enables both parties to be confident the match is right before the point of hire saving time and money.

 

For participants it’s likely the fact there is a permanent provisional job upfront – the prize they secure on successful completion.  They don’t have to rely on  trying to ‘sell’ their skills and potential through a cv to secure an interview nor explain gaps in skills, qualification, self-confidence if they manage to secure that elusive interview.

 

For JobCentre Plus (JCP) – it’s the fact their customers go into permanent jobs and learn skills to stay employed thereby not returning to benefits.  In addition, many of their customers not selected by an employer for a permanent role, learn from feedback given to enhance their future employment approaches.  While I quote 148 into permanent jobs – JCP will say the figure is much hire – which is great to hear!

 

For Care Leavers’ Organisations – employment is the critical key  to leaving care confidently.  Having a steady income enables everyone to make choices in their lives.  It gives us all control.  It isn’t enough to have somewhere safe to live without the means to pay the rent!

 

For me – it’s the fact a programme I designed, wrote and delivered is still being funded by a global financial services and is now on it’s 22nd programme!  I never expected this and shows the critical key of never doubting yourself – if you do, you’ll talk yourself out of doing anything!  If you keep going, you will find solutions for problems as they arise.  I also find it remarkable how difficult it is to get this unique, free tool to employers and those looking for work.

 

Seth Godin – talks about the Purple Cow.  When we have so much choice and so little time, we often don’t see what’s there unless it’s remarkable.  Cost & risk free recruitment without any catch is remarkable and still doesn’t get ‘word of mouth spread’  What are your thoughts on spreading the word?

 

 

 

 

As an employer – how do you know you’ve found ‘the one’?

It’s difficult and time consuming trying to identify the right talent for your business before hiring, not just from a skillset point of view but also personal outlook, fit with the team and company ethos as well as future potential, before hiring them.

 

At the point of hire in traditional recruitment, a lot of time and money has been spent on composing the vacancy, advertising it, potentially engaging recruitment agencies, a contract has been drawn-up, payroll has been set-up – all without knowing if the individual is a good fit in all areas and has the potential to grow.

 

If there is a ‘miss-match’ there is not only a cost implication but also a decrease in team moral.

 

Surely a ‘try before you buy’ works for both sides.  Enter Growing Talent!  Now I know what some employers may think who have not been involved in anything like this before…”the unemployed never work out”, “there is no commitment from the unemployed – they’re used to not working”.

 

As the saying goes – the proof is in the pudding – as many naysayers have found.

 

Alex, on the current programme with Portico, recently had his first appraisal.  After just a few short weeks on site, he’s exceeded expectations in all areas.  Outstanding feedback from the team is a natural self esteem booster.  Alex is looking forward to the remaining training ahead.  Already, he’s been identified as a perfect addition to the team – something the employer would not have secured without Growing Talent.

 

Why aren’t all employers recruiting through Growing Talent?  I’d love to know…

 

 

http://www.growing-talent.co.uk

Growing Talent 18 – how has the first week been?

The first week training in their potential end jobs is always tough.  It’s about managing instant expectations and keeping the end goal in site – easier said than done for many!

 

After being unemployed – even for a short time – leaving the routine of your comfort zone takes courage, determination, tenacity and grit. Qualities that not everyone has.

 

So where are the Growing Talent 18 Associates ? & how have they got on?

 

Kam is working with the Portico team on their PwC accounts cross training in all areas at two sites in London – Charing Cross and London Bridge.  Based there with Kam is Alex…

 

Alex summed the first week as ‘so much to learn, but it’s really good – I made the right choice.’ Alex was in the lucky position of having a number of employers offer him provisional roles on Growing Talent.

 

Helen below is very happy working with the reception team at Regent Group in Wimbledon…..

 

‘The team are really friendly.  It’s different work to the world of corporate switchboard which I’ve been used to but I really like it and the travelling isn’t bad! Just an hour max door to door including all the walking to stations/interchanges etc.

‘The days are really long but I’m really enjoying it’ shared Tom above who is working with the Social Media team on video content.  ‘The days are really long as I’m in 7.45 to 8am each day but I’ve found a local part to go to each lunchtime’.

 

Leo had a tough week not least because he, by his own admission, is very impatient and want everything now!  Working with Scotscape – a living wall specialist, Leo is hands-on in his role

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Mohammed, above, is learning the ropes with Acuity Services’ Elite Team.  The Elite Team are trained in all accounts to enable them to seamlessly cover holidays and sickness.  Mohammed is keen to get his teeth into something demanding responsibility.

 

Lastly AJ is learning to support Amrik – Talent Acquisition at Regent Group to deliver an exemplary service in securing and training the right talent to ensure Regent Group grow efficiently.

 

AJ’s a little camera shy so no photo!

 

The biggest transition for anyone one on Growing Talent to complete the programme and secure the provisional job offer is managing their ‘instant expectations’.  By this I mean, we are so used to getting everything we want ‘now’ without having to wait for it. Eg, order a takeaway on line and it’s delivered to your door, same with a weekly shop, clothes, maintenance equipment, furniture in fact just a bout anything.

 

However, two things you won’t ever secure instantly are meaningful relationships and a career! Both have to be worked at, nurtured and sustained.

 

Check back to see how the guys get on over the coming weeks……………

 

 

GYO – Good idea?

PWC-Growing Talent-SET (2)I run a platform – Growing Talent – devised by business for the free use of business to identify and grow their potential new talent before hiring them cost free.

 

This is a mutual ‘test drive’ for both the employer and potential new employee to ensure a confident, sustainable match.

 

This is the 2nd week of a two week run on overground trains on – Southern, South East and South Western – over 1,500 carriages in all.

 

Over the last four years, more than 125 unemployed people from all backgrounds have secured permanent roles, grown in confidence and – in their own words – changed their lives.

 

But do employers really want to try something different?  Something innovative that delivers results or just keep doing what they are doing using time, money and other valuable resources but not always identifying the right person.

 

What are you thoughts?  Is Growing Talent a good or bad thing….. please let me know your thoughts……

 

http://www.growing-talent.co.uk focussing on the holistic journey into permanent employment.

1st Impressions…

Reading The Metro on the train this morning, there was a small piece on a group supporting offenders completing their sentence to be given a £1K package to include grooming costs, clothes etc to enable them to make a great 1st impression when meeting prospective employers.

 

A great idea.  But are 1st impressions still appropriate?

 

I’ve noticed more and more, in the corporate world especially, how dress code has changed to become almost non-existent.

 

It almost seems unacceptable now to give personal image guidance to increase someone’s chances of making a great 1st impression.

 

I hope the group trying to support the offenders are successful.  People leaving prison clearly have a number of hurdles to get over if they are going to make a successful transition.

 

Personally, I know that I perform more confidently if I’m dressed appropriately for the situation/event.

 

So just how important is ‘dress to impress’ ‘no 2nd chance at a 1st impression’ now?

 

What do you think?……….

Introduction of GDPR

Quite rightly the ability of marketing companies, charity fundraisers etc has been curbed with the introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulations – the EU initiative being introduced in May 2018.

 

We have read the tragic results of elderly people being hounded to suicide through incessant calls by charity fundraisers.  These charities had brought personal data from other sources without the individual’s knowledge.

 

I get that having legal terms and disclaimer on websites where the fact data can be sold is in place  (out of sight, out of mind maybe?) but how many people read the small print on websites?

 

No one should be able to sell someone else’s data on full stop.

 

But what about organisations who make no money but help people on their journey into work.  If they are prohibited by GDPR legislation from keeping details on file, how do they defend themselves if a malicious claim is made?  Without documented evidence there is no defence.

 

What’s the solutions?  Break the GDPR regulations or be open to abuse?

 

Im not at all sure……….

Is there a block with employers recognising the value of ideas from those working for them?

Most definitely! Is my conclusion….

 

On Growing Talent, everyone is technically unemployed and training in a vacant role which is their provisional job offer if they complete.  Very quickly, most who are enthused and see the value of this opportunity, will quickly see fresh ways of ‘upselling’ their ’employer’s’ goods/services.

 

From what I’ve seen, these ‘fresh eyes’ and therefore ideas are usually dismissed without investigation.  It seems to me employers see ‘unemployed’ rather than ‘human with ideas that could work’!  Why is that?

 

Like him or loathe him Gordon Ramsey’s Kitchen Nightmares include a segment of a new menu which me makes everyone taste and get to know.  This way, everyone can sell those dishes, give information to customers which in return will positively hit the bottom line.  It also ensures the individual is involved and enthused about the restaurant.

 

What an idea!  Ensure all staff know your values, products/services, reason for being……..

 

Maybe it’s time for some employers to think a different way?

 

I was reminded of this by Simon Sinek talking on YouTube about the Puerperal Fever deaths of the 1800s – known as childbed fever in which both mother and child died.  It was discovered the fever was caused by infection delivered by doctors.  At this point in time, medicine had graduated to investigation and understanding so autopsies were carried out.  Unfortunately, hand washing and tool sanitisation wasn’t!  Doctors would carry out autopsies in the morning then deliver babies in the afternoon without washing their hands.  However, pride that they were the cause meant no change happened for decades!  What a difference if looking at the idea of washing hands and giving it a try would have made.

 

For me there are similarities with employers who won’t listen to new ideas.  Keep doing the same thing.  Keep getting the same result.

 

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