GDPR – Are you ready?

I found it surprisingly easy to register on the Information Commissioner Office’s website (ICO).  Usually these Government type websites are inflexible and it is nigh on impossible to use.

 

I decided to take the opportunity of GDPR on 28 May 2018 to think about how I get, store, use and destroy information I hold on those people I am trying to get into work or those clients I am working with to upskill their teams in mental health and well being.

 

What I noticed about the ICO’s website is you can type everything in about your data processes so it’s absolutely clear to all stakeholders what happens to their data, their rights and obligations.  Usually, it’s a ‘square peg and round hole’ scenario where you have to try to make generic drop down menus fit with your business.

 

In addition, I’ve introduced a full data information sheet which I issue to everyone and get their signature on a receipt index.

 

As an added measure, for clarity, I’ve introduced a digital recording system for all 1-2-1 meetings and an additional authorisation sheet is signed for this.

 

There is a lot of anticipation around GDPR.  When you look at it as protection for your business, it’s not nearly as onerous as it first looks.

 

Social Media – is ‘social’ the right word?

The rapid growth of users to the social media platforms has exploded in recent years.  It’s now acceptable for mobile phones to accompany us everywhere – and I mean everywhere!

 

I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve heard people clearly on their mobiles in toilet cubicles!  Hygenic? Courteous to the caller?  If it’s private, why not go outside the building?

 

How rude the shoppers refusing to hang up their call whilst trying to pack their shopping, pay the cashier whilst balancing their mobile under their chin!

 

Is this civilised communication?

 

Like a free coffee whilst shopping in some chains, it seems something we never thought we’d need, but very quickly some can’t do without!

 

Over recent  months I’ve attended various meetings/conferences where social media is clearly a double edged sword.  There was the mum who highlighted her daughter had been bullied 24/7 to the point of suicidal thoughts – even moving school didn’t arrest this evil pursuit.  Then there is the fledging business that after meeting with professionals and learning about Search Engine Optimisation, they increased their social media activity and saw their ranking on search engines increase rapidly.

 

Then of course, delivering training I notice how many people bring their phones with them.  Rudeness, presenteeism etc don’t seem to enter their heads, so without trying, they give a really bad impression of their commitment, enthusiasm etc.

 

What prompted this reflection?  Seeing on the news JD Weatherspoons has closed all 900 social media accounts as well as their 700,000 strong personal email database.  The reason they give is they don’t like the compulsive use of social media, the trolling and so on.

 

It will be interesting to see if other companies follow this action and if JD Weatherspoons re-activates their accounts in the future.

 

There is something in ‘compulsive’ use – how many people do you know who go out with family/friends and then spend the night texting? or the colleague who insists on taking their mobile in meetings?

 

Maybe we really should be conscious of our use of this technology…..

 

Simon Sinek the British American Motivator, Business Consultant and excellent public speaker has a number of films on YouTube.  Below is one on millennials which brilliantly illustrates the impact of the technology/social media……

 

What are your thoughts?  Do we need to be more disciplined in our use of technology/social media?

 

 

The social media feature photo is by Geralt.

Introduction of GDPR

Quite rightly the ability of marketing companies, charity fundraisers etc has been curbed with the introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulations – the EU initiative being introduced in May 2018.

 

We have read the tragic results of elderly people being hounded to suicide through incessant calls by charity fundraisers.  These charities had brought personal data from other sources without the individual’s knowledge.

 

I get that having legal terms and disclaimer on websites where the fact data can be sold is in place  (out of sight, out of mind maybe?) but how many people read the small print on websites?

 

No one should be able to sell someone else’s data on full stop.

 

But what about organisations who make no money but help people on their journey into work.  If they are prohibited by GDPR legislation from keeping details on file, how do they defend themselves if a malicious claim is made?  Without documented evidence there is no defence.

 

What’s the solutions?  Break the GDPR regulations or be open to abuse?

 

Im not at all sure……….

Website Built with WordPress.com.

Up ↑