Are our rights more important than our duty to others?

This is a thought that’s been resonating with me with growing repetition during the journey of the global pandemic here in the UK.

It seems to me humankind has become more and more inward rather than outward looking over the years.

As the restrictions enforced by the pandemic have continued, the more amplified our disregard for our duty to others seems to have grown.

By that I mean consideration of the potential consequences our actions can have on others.

Each week, local small patches of council green areas outside residential houses are scattered with litter comprising fast food wrappers but lately discarded alcohol bottles. I haven’t seen people having picnics on these areas so assume it’s household fly tipping by residents, or people returning from fun in the park with their friends.

Why? Each household in the UK has rubbish collection weekly. There is no need to spoil the environment for others through laziness and/or entitlement. If there is no public rubbish bin locally, or if there is one, it’s full – why can’t people take their rubbish home and put it in for their rubbish collection?

I don’t doubt this is happening in every part of the UK.

Clearly the thought of the right to personal enjoyment of the individuals dropping these items far outweighs any thought of their impact on others. Children play on these small greens. Pet dogs are taken for walks by their owners. Residents look at these green spaces from their windows – vital when housebound or shielding. Where is the thought for the impact on others – the anxiety and isolation caused by thoughtless, ‘my right’ attitudes?

We see this time and again on a larger scale when the sun is shining in the debris left behind in parks and at coastal spots. There is a huge cost in clearly this up.

We know the dangers to the environment of discarded rubbish which has been proven to get into our water tables and food chains. By discarding rubbish thoughtlessly instead of taking it home, those individuals are potentially affecting their health and that of the ones they love. Ironic isn’t it?

Isn’t now the time to start to think of our duty to consider the impact of our behaviours on others?

A step too far?

Some years back, I was introduced to Adam who had just started working with Jamie at a national recruitment company.

Sharply dressed, seemingly able to talk to anyone at any level confidently and make up really good raps for audiences ‘off the cuff’. A real ‘presence’ in the room, Adam was late teens when I met him not sure of the path he would ultimately take.

Several different jobs over the years followed before Lockdown hit. At Christmas 2020, after almost a year of uncertainty the global pandemic has brought us all to trying degrees, Adam took the massive, in my view, step of getting on a plane and going to Tanzania. Without a job/home to go to there, Adam wanted a complete change.

He reached out to me to discuss his next moves and explore his thoughts – I was honoured.

I was shocked by the reality of Dar es Salaam from the photos Adam sent me which were the polar opposite of my perceptions of what this African City would be like.

Curtesy of Adam, I share a photo of his new home City:

According to Adam the pace of life is much slower compared to London and has given him time to think what he really wants to do.

Taking the time to ask ourselves ‘are we happy?’ and ‘does it feel right’ enable us to take the pulse of where we are and helps answer those questions of whether to keep going down a certain path or change.

Adam’s had the time and space to figure out his next move by relocating to Tanzania – even if to some of us it feels like a step too far.

Of course, it may not be practical to relocate to the other side of the world to find what we want to do. We don’t have to. Giving ourselves some space alone to think about our own happiness and whether what we are doing ‘feels right’ will give us the same ignition for our own next steps.

Kanye West for President?

We’ve all see the headlines over the weekend.  Could a rap star become President of USA?

 

Well history says yes.  Remember Ronald Reagan? a previous actor who went into politics becoming the 33rd Governor of California before being elected 40th President of USA serving from 1981-1989.  He gained his experience in local politics first.

 

So the exposure across social media and press outlets over the weekend showing Kanye talking about his wife becoming a billionaire  and running for President  could technically happen.  He certainly has the celebrity status and money as well as supporters and backers required.

 

Will USA go from one rich celebrity who has lived in that bubble for so long to another for their president?  Time will tell.

 

One thing is for sure, we live in a world where anything is possible.  We don’t have to stay in the circle we were born into.

 

Time to seize the day?  Something to think about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speed dating – Growing Talent style!

The toughest thing to overcome when looking for employment after a period of unemployment is being judged on your label(s).

 

By that I mean recruiters/employers ofter see your label(s) and the assumptions they make about the potential impact of those label(s) without speaking with you to understand the facts.

 

For example, a homeless, single parent who is unemployed will often be perceived as someone who is unstable and unreliable with zero transferable skills into the world of employment.

 

In reality, homeless doesn’t always mean ‘sleeping on the streets’ – although I think sleeping is the wrong word.  No one can sleep soundly on the streets with all the dangers that environment presents.

 

Single parents, in my experience,  have an array of skills which add value to employers.  All are great problem solvers, they are life coaches, highly organised solution finders with strong time management skills along with the drive and attitude to succeed to be positive role models for their children as well as establish a career path for themselves.  Any employer can train in their area of expertise but they can’t train ‘attitude’.  They are missing an excellent talent pool.

 

At Growing Talent, based on my own experience, we do not allow traditional recruitment methods.  There are no cvs nor job descriptions.  Employers select based on their belief of someone’s attitude to grow into their vacancy.  As every applicant has usually more than one barrier to employment, we partner with JobCentre Plus to ensure a financial safety net if someone is selected but doesn’t complete and secure the provisional permanent job offer.  This removes the ‘fear’ from those unemployed people who really want to work but have that nagging ‘what if’ in their heads.

 

So, to ensure employers and applicants are on the same level playing field, we have a speed dating session.  These always start really quietly.  Within 10minutes everyone is relaxed, laughing with each other and showing who they really are.

 

In small groups, applicants spend 10 minutes at each employer table finding out a little about the company and permanent jobs on offer.  The employers have the same window of time to find out a little about all applicants.

 

Some examples of previously employer speed dating events:

 

Employers select their shortlist from this event.  Shortlisted applicants attend a 1-2-1 meeting on the employer site where the job is based to learn more details.

 

At the point any offers are made to go on the Growing Talent journey with the employer, everything is known upfront about the end job.  There is no mystery around salary, bonus, benefits, hours, shifts etc.

 

How often do you go for a traditional job interview and leave as mystified as when you went in?

 

Growing Talent removes any doubt for both sides and everyone loves the spontaneity of speed dating – who not use it in recruitment?

Sexism? Been around for decades…..

There is rightly a lot in the press at the moment about sexism across society and business.  Danny Cotton is pushing for the term ‘Fireman’ to be abolished and ‘Firefighter’ to be used.

Pay inequality is rife and across all industries.  Sometimes it’s hard to remember the Equalities Act is seven years old when we still have this divide going on.

 

Yesterday Theresa May invited five ‘Canary Girls’ to 10 Downing Street to say ‘thank you’ for their role in the war.  All in their 90s, they recollected the dangers they worked in without even thinking about it.

 

Cordite was the substance they worked with in the ammunitions factories to make the explosives for the front.  Exposure to this – remember, long before our stringent H&S laws, turned the users yellow like canaries.

 

Looking back over history we have many examples of women breaking barriers despite how impenetrable these barriers initially seemed.

 

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson – became the first UK female doctor in the 1860s.  Nancy Astor became the first female MP in 1919.  Caroline Herschel was awarded the Royal Astronomical Society’s gold medal in 1828.  In 1848 Mary Sommerville’s book on Physical Geography was used in schools for the next 50 years.  The list goes on. It’s clear these women and every woman throughout history who has become an influence in their chosen field, may not have set out to break any glass ceilings or sexist views, but what happy by products!

 

I remember one of the first Asian female CEO’s said she never noticed a glass ceiling, she just got on with the job.

 

Sir Nicholas Winton said ethics kept him doing his work.  When asked what he meant he explained humanity’s ethics of decency, kindness, acceptance etc which he also felt were now gone.  If we treated each other with dignity and respect would we have the inequality we do?  I doubt it.

 

Surely every child just needs to be nurtured to belief they can achieve anything if they believe in themselves.

 

What a great example the ‘Canary Girls’ and every other person of achievement is to all of us no matter our gender, culture, race etc.  Any human being can achieve if they believe they can.

Mental Health First Aid – Lite

Just been retained to deliver three workshops for 60 people in total for a global organisation with HQ in London.

 

With diverse backgrounds in the room, these should be an effective training sessions!

 

Lite is an introduction to the full Adult First Aid course.  It covers:

 

  1. Languages & Mental Health Issues
  2. What is Mental Health
  3. Mental Health Problems
  4. Supporting people in distress
  5. Managing our own well-being

 

Covering 3 hours, the course is designed to be a taster in understanding this complex subject.

In Leah’s World…

Leah fell into Growing Talent as a Graduate in the Summer of 2015.  On Graduation she secured a work experience placement with JobCentre Plus.  She accompanied a JCP manager to the employer selection day to help out and ended up being interviewed and given a placement!

 

During her employment journey she has gone from receptionist to managing a multi-client building to running events and now manages two staff in delivering monthly newsletters, facts, challenges on a different subject in the world of mental health to 6 partner companies!

 

More importantly on a personal level she had never been abroad before.  Since the Summer of 2015 when she joined Growing Talent she has been to Italy, France, Spain & Portugal – three times!

 

The power of working!

 

Remember opportunities can come from unexpected events…………

Growing Talent 12 Begins!

After the preliminary screening sessions by JobCentre Plus, charities and myself we were ready for the Employers’ Speed Dating sessions held at Southwark Cathedral’s Gary Weston Library on 24 January 2017.

 

We call it speed dating because there are no cvs nor job descriptions.  The selection is based on personalities alone!  A unique way to recruit.

 

Employers had a table each and small groups of applicants on 10 minute rotation to decided who they wanted to see for the final selection stage.

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(l-r – Scott, James & Lois from Mitie Connect)

Scott and James were new to Growing Talent.  Despite not knowing what it was all about properly – they embraced the change and identified Stefan who joins the team on a global cosmetic account.

 

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Frances & Dan above are used to Growing Talent having recruited several members of staff on previous programmes.  Here they are chatting with Ilamathy.  Working for a global hotel brand – it’s not always easy identifying the ideal candidate(s).  Growing Talent allows confidence in all hires for all parties.

 

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Selvan and Shane of Invest in Buy to Let have several companies between them.  On this occasion, they were seeking a personality to fill a marketing role.

 

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Jamie & Adam of Pertemps are huge supporters of Growing Talent not only filling their own consultant vacancies but trying to support those who don’t get selected for a place.

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Ebb and Christina her colleague from Holiday Inn Bradford Lock were joined by newcomer Gemma of Crown Plaza hotel in Canary Wharf. Ebb is a cheerleader of Growing Talent having recruited from the programme previously.  She also appears in the latest film with Michel Burke – check out the Case Studies tab at http://www.growing-talent.co.uk

 

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A welcome return to Iron Mountain who have just undergone a global takeover which meant they were away from Growing Talent’s last few programmes.  Above are Steph, Russ & Michelle speaking with one of their three recruits on Growing Talent – John!

 

Finally – the Growing Talent Associates below were selected…….

John, Ashling & Craig join Iron Mountain

Mokhtar, Zainab & Ashley – join Harrow Green

Sebastien – joins Invest In Buy to Let

Leon – joins Pertemps

Ilamathy – joins Red Personnel

Stefan – joins Mitie Connect

 

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Check back to see how the fabulous 10 get on………

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diversity or not Diversity – when is it really an issue?

Recently there has been a media scramble over the injustice of what women have to wear to work in the UK compared to male counterparts.

 

Over the weekend uproar has erupted over Muirfield’s decision to remain a male members club and continue their long tradition of male only members –  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-36337914.

 

This decision has cost them the future consideration to be host of the Open Championship – a prestigious event in golf and money spinner for local businesses.  There has been an outcry over women’s right to join this club.

 

Yet again the media seems to stoke the ‘diversity’ fire without balance.  Why doesn’t the WI admit male members?  There are a lot of male, single parents who manage a household as well as the children and would probably welcome the knowledge and support of people (both sexes) in the same position.

 

Does the media feel we are all too stupid to form an opinion if given all the information?  I guess inflammatory headlines sell papers .

 

Is the fact we live in a country where private members clubs such as Muirfield and WI can set gender exclusion barriers testament to our freedoms?  Or should all clubs/institutions be open to all – mandatory?

 

 

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